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Lower Risk

Least concern (LC) – Lowest risk; does not qualify for a higher risk category. Widespread and abundant taxa are included in this category.
Conservation Dependent (CD) - Dependent on conservation efforts to prevent it from becoming threatened with endangerment/extinction.
Near threatened (NT) – Likely to become endangered in the near future.

Threatened

Vulnerable (VU) – High risk of endangerment in the wild.
Endangered (EN) – High risk of extinction in the wild.
Critically endangered (CR) – Extremely high risk of extinction in the wild.

Extinct

Extinct in the wild (EW) – Known only to survive in captivity, or as a naturalized population outside its historic range.
Extinct (EX) – No known individuals remaining.

Other

Data deficient (DD) – Not enough data to make an assessment of its risk of extinction.
Not evaluated (NE) – Has not yet been evaluated against the criteria.

Atlas Sylph

Conservation Status: Conservation Dependent (CD)

They are based on the Atlas Moth.

Biology

They are one of the largest Sylph subspecies, typically growing about nine inches from head to tail base, with a wingspan that averages seventeen inches.

Their bodies are a vivid coloration of oranges, reds and whites, with occasional streaks of black and pink.

Temperament

Habitat

Birdwing Sylph

Conservation Status: Least Concern (LC)

They are based on the Birdwing Butterfly.

Biology

A subspecies named for the shape of its two pairs of wings, which resemble that of a bird's; even their tail is somewhat similar to the tail of a bird.

Temperament

Habitat

Comet Sylph

Conservation Status: Conservation Dependent (CD)

They, as well as the Hawk Sylph, are one of the two fastest fliers of all Sylph subspecies.

They are based on the Comet Moth.

Biology

They typically reach about six inches from head to tail base, and have an average wingspan of about ten inches; their tails are somewhat longer than their bodies. Their name comes from their slender tails and ribbon-like lower wings, which makes them look like comets while in flight. Their top pair of wings are somewhat triangular in shape, while the lower pair has a long, ribbon-like extension at the bottom of each.

Comet Sylphs are predominantly gold in color, with dark brown patterns along their bodies and wings, as well as brownish "eye spots" on their wings. However, Comet Sylphs that are predominantly orange, pinkish-red or even light blue have been reported, as well as rare leucistic specimens.

Temperament

A somewhat flighty and nervous subspecies.

Habitat

Dragon Sylph

Conservation Status: Conservation Dependent (CD)

They are based on the Dragonfly.

Biology

They are the only subspecies to have scales instead of fur. They have two pairs of translucent wings, tinted red or orange in color, that are somewhat diamond in shape. They have rather long, slender tails ending in a small spike, and have thin antenna. They also have fin-like ridges on the sides of their heads.

Temperament

They are the most aggressive subspecies of Sylph.

Habitat

Hawk Sylph

Conservation Status: Least Concern (LC)

They, as well as the Comet Sylph, are one of the two fastest fliers of all Sylph subspecies.

They are based on the Hawk Moth.

Biology

Temperament

Habitat

Marbled Sylph

Conservation Status: Conservation Dependent (CD)

They are based on the Marbled Clover Moth.

Biology

Temperament

Habitat

Monarch Sylph

Conservation Status: Least Concern (LC)

They are based on the Monarch Butterfly.

Biology

Temperament

Habitat

Moon Sylph

Conservation Status: Endangered (EN)

Thanks to the work of poachers, the numbers of Moon Sylphs have dropped drastically.

They are based on the Indian Moon Moth.

Biology

Temperament

Habitat

Plumed Sylph

Conservation Status: Near Threatened (NT)

They are based on the Plume Moth.

Biology

Plumed Sylphs are characterized by their three pairs of fairly thin, feathered wings, and incredibly long, feathery antenna-ears and head extensions; their tails are also quite long and feathered. Ignoring their wings, tails and other extensions, however, they are one of the smallest subspecies of Sylphs, rarely reaching 5 inches in length.

Temperament

Habitat

Plumed Sylphs are most commonly found in the jungles of Soumerca.

Rosy Sylph

Conservation Status: Least Concern (LC)

They are based on the Rosy Maple Moth.

Biology

One of the smallest subspecies of Sylph that typically grows to only 5 inches in length (not counting their wings and tails), Rosy Sylphs are characterized by their distinctive pink and yellow colors. They are a popular domestic breed, with many people adoring their soft, fluffy features and their coloration. Rosy Sylphs have somewhat longer fur than other Sylph subspecies, and rather small, rounded antenna.

Their two pairs of somewhat small wings are mostly pink, with a horizontal yellow band running across it. The mane that runs down from their heads is yellow in color, and most of their face is yellow as well, with a pale pink muzzle and eye markings. Their bodies are mostly yellow, with a pale pink chest and stomach. Rosy Sylphs also have slightly chubbier bodies.

Temperament

Rosy Sylphs are one of the more gentle and amiable breeds; this too makes them popular pets. They love being around their owners, and may even nestle into any pockets in their clothing.

Habitat

Skullhead Sylph

Conservation Status: Least Concern (LC)

Long considered to be ill omens, despite the fact that they are harmless. They are also one of the most vocal subspecies of Sylph, and are one of the few nocturnal subspecies.

They are based on the Death's-Head Hawkmoth.

Biology

Temperament

With the Skullhead Sylph's nocturnal nature in tandem with the fact that they are incredibly vocal, virtually no effort has been made to domesticate them; as pets, they would be active (and noisy) at night, ensuring that they would be unpopular. This is further cemented by the fact that, like all Sylphs, they are social creatures, and as such, practically thrive on their owner's interaction; few people are willing to swap their sleeping schedules around for the benefit of a Skullhead Sylph.

Because of this, only Summoners and Dark Clan members have been known to keep Skullhead Sylphs; Summoners have a different, often more complex relationship with their Summons, unlike an owner with their pet, while the people of the Dark Clan are known for having nocturnal (or at least more flexible) schedules which benefits the nocturnal Skullhead greatly.

Habitat

They are most commonly found on the continents of Eurish and Yurashia; a large colony of them lives near the Fearful Caverns.

Swallowtail Sylph

Conservation Status: Least Concern (LC)

They are based on the Swallowtail Butterfly.

Biology

Temperament

Habitat

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